Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Program  

The National Science Foundation Archaeology Program:
Insight into the Grant Application and Award Process


Advanced Metal Detecting for the Archaeologist (AMDA): Fourth Class Offering

Introduction to Digital Repositories for Archaeological Materials: tDAR

Introduction to Archaeological Digital Data Management

Introduction to Teaching Forensic Archaeology

Introduction to Flaked Stone Tool Technologies

Underwater Cultural Heritage Awareness Workshop

SAA's Introduction to Archaeological Damage Assessment

An Introduction to the Section 106 Process

SAA seminar with Fred Limp

SAA Seminar with Ken Sassaman

Public Archaeology is a Moving Target

Get Hired!

SRI Foundation Offering Two RPA-Certified Courses


Earn Certification for your Program!

The Register of Professional Archaeologists recognizes that archaeological training is a lifelong endeavor. The Register's code of conduct states that it is an archaeologist's responsibility to "stay informed and knowledgeable about developments in her/ his field or fields of specialization" (2. 1. b) and that an archaeologist shall not "undertake any research that affects the archaeological resource base for which she/ he is not qualified" (1. 2. d). To meet these requirements, archaeologists must continue to learn long after acquiring their graduate degree and RPA recognition. It is an archaeologist's duty to stay abreast of changes in field practices, technological innovations, analytical techniques, legal requirements, and ethical conduct.

The Register does not require demonstrations of continuing professional education (CPE) to maintain recognition as a Registered Professional Archaeologist (RPA). Instead, as a service RPAs and the discipline, the Register certifies CPE programs such as training courses, workshops, and other learning activities that meet the Register's mission of improving archaeological standards and conduct. The Register is not a CPE provider and derives no financial benefit from CPE program certification.

The Register invites providers of training courses or other professional development programs to participate in the Register's CPE initiative by applying for certification of educational opportunities. In certifying the training, RPA will inform the RPAs that the professional training opportunity has been reviewed by the Register and that it meets the standards of the Register. RPA will post CPE program information on the RPA website and inform the RPA electronic mail list of the opportunity. To encourage applications for professional training course certifications, RPA is waiving applications fees through 2013.

Click here for more Information and Criteria for Program Certification

Click here to download the PDF application for Program Certification


The National Science Foundation Archaeology Program:
Insight into the Grant Application and Award Process

This one-hour online seminar is designed for graduate students as well as more senior researchers -both archaeologists and individuals in related disciplines - who might consider submitting proposals to the NSF Archaeology Program or other relevant NSF competitions.

The central goal of the seminar is to explain to potential applicants how the Archaeology Program at NSF is organized and functions. The grant application process will be explained and the characteristics of successful proposals described. Advice will be provided and specific questions answered through question and answer interaction.

Participants in the online seminar will:

 

  1. Gain sufficient knowledge regarding the Archaeology Program's goals, individual competitions, potential and limitations to determine whether it would make sense to consider an application submission
     
  2. Receive advice on proposal writing and insight into how proposals are evaluated will provide useful information for crafting a successful application
     
  3. Have the opportunity to ask, and receive answers to specific questions they may have. These likely will be of broader general interest.

Contact Information:

Dr. John Yellen
Phone: (703) 292-8759
Email: jyellen@nsf.gov


Advanced Metal Detecting for the Archaeologist (AMDA) – Fourth Class
Little Rock and Scott, Arkansas | October 3-5, 2014

 

Advanced Metal Detecting for the Archaeologist (AMDA) will present its fourth class offering, in Scott, Arkansas on October 3-5, 2014. AMDA is certified under the Register of Professional Archaeologists’ continuing professional education program. The goal of the class is to provide professional archaeologists with an understanding of current best practices in metal detecting, and to provide the opportunity to gain hands-on experience with a variety of devices from a variety of manufacturers.
 
The course is offered with 16-credit and 24-credit options. Under the former, there are 8 hours of classroom work and 8 hours of field instruction/experience. Under the latter, the field portion is expanded to 16 hours and the classroom remains 8 hours. Fees will be $275 for 16 credits and $350 for 24 credits. 
 
For more information please contact Chris Espenshade at cespenshade@ccrginc.com or Patrick Severts at (770) 594-4734 or Pseverts@newsouthassoc.com
 
For an application forms, please see http://www.newsouthassoc.com/amda/index.html .

Advanced Metal Detecting for the Archaeologist is pleased to announce that Minelab will be providing up to five tuition scholarships for their next class. Please click here for more information.


Introduction to Digital Repositories for Archaeological Materials: tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record)

 

The seminar will introduce participants to the types of digital repositories that are available and options for accessing and archiving archaeological materials. The seminar will also outline what archaeologists should look for when choosing a digital repository for their own materials. Using tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record) as a case study, participants will also learn about online digital archiving strategies. tDAR is one such digital repository that allows users to discover and access information specifically about archaeological resources and topics, upload their data to the repository to ensure that it is preserved, and search for and analyze data as part of their research projects.
 
This seminar will introduce participants to the types of digital repositories that are available and where they can browse, access and download archaeological documents, data sets, images and other kinds of archaeological information. Archaeologists, whether they work in CRM, for government agencies, or in academic positions, can use digital repositories to store, organize and promote their archaeological work.  Using tDAR (the Digital Archaeological Record) as a case study, participants will learn how to access and use resources in the repository and curate and manage CRM reports, data sets, photographs, GIS files and other archaeologically relevant digital resources.

Introduction to Archaeological Digital Data Management

 

 

Archaeology today relies heavily on digital data: photographs taken in the field, GIS information, analytical and descriptive data sets, project reports, etc. This is in addition to an existing, underutilized backlog of archaeological information. Without a well thought-out approach to data management, important information will be overlooked or lost because it is forgotten, misplaced or damaged. Good digital data management requires attention to the means of data storage, aspects of archiving data, how data are to be preserved, and the curation of data so that is discoverable, accessible and usable. This online seminar will introduce participants to the background of data management, how good data management is organized, and tools and methods that they can integrate into their existing project and research workflows to ensure good management of digital data. Click here for more information on the Center for Digital Antiquity.

Registration is now open for this course, which will take place on February 18, 2014 fgrom 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. Please click here for more information about the course and registration.


Introduction to Teaching Forensic Archaeology

The primary goal of this course is to introduce participants to the special problems encountered in the application of archaeological techniques to crime, accident or disaster scene investigations. After this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Begin work on the design of a course in forensic archaeology
  • Identify the intellectual skills and practical tools students will need to have in order to participate in forensic archaeology
  • Inventory specific archaeological field skills to include in a course on forensic archaeology

This two-hour seminar is divided into twlve ten-minute segments. Each topic will be explored for the purpose of claifying the differences between traditional field archaeology and the special requirements of forensic archaeology. Please click here for more information.


Introduction to Flaked Stone Tool Technologies

 Archaeological Investigations Northwest, Inc.'s (AINW) five-day program emphasizes hands-on production and analysis of flaked stone tools and debitage. Participants become familiar with several tool technologies (including core, biface, bipolar, and blade technologies), and learn to recognize and identify the distinctive manufacturing products and by-products of each. The program promotes the RPA goals of professional development through enhancing interpretive capabilities in recognizing behaviors associated with ancient technologies. These lithic technology analysis methods are commonly needed in archaeology due to the abundance of flaked stone lithic materials at prehistoric archaeological sites.

 
This one-week (five consecutive eight-hour days) program provides an intensive immersion in learning the mechanics of producing stone tools and learning to identify technologically diagnostic attributes based on comparing archaeological and experimental materials.
 

Underwater Cultural Heritage Awareness Workshop

This workshop, offered annual by the Advisory Council on Underwater Archaeology (ACUA), is a full-day training event at the Society for Historical Archaeology's (SHA) Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology on January 8, 2014.

Cultural resource managers, land managers, and archaeologists are often tasked with managing, interpreting, and reviewing archaeological assessments for submerged cultural resources. This workshop is designed to introduce non-specialists to issues specific to underwater archaeology. Participants will learn about different types of underwater cultural heritage (UCH) sites, and the techniques used in Phase I and II equivalent surveys. This workshop is not intended to teach participants how to do underwater archaeology, but will introduce different investigative techniques, international Best Practices, and existing legislation. The purpose of this workshop is to assist non-specialists in recognizing the potential for UCH resources in their areas of impact, budgeting for UCH resource investigations, reviewing UCH resource assessments, developing interpretive strategies, and providing sufficient background information to assist in making informed decisions regarding UCH resources.

There are no prerequisites for this workshop, and it is open to all eligible RPAs.
 


SAA's Introduction to Archaeological Damage Assessment

The goals of this online seminar are to provide an introduction to archaeological damage assessment and to show participants what roles they are qualified to perform in the archaeological damage assessment process.

After taking the seminar, participants will:

  • understand what archaeological damage assessment is and the legal basis for it
  • understand the procedures involved in archaeological damage assessment
  • understand the professional qualifications necessary to conduct each of the components of archaeological damage assessment and the legal standards for expert witness testimony

This two-hour, online seminar is intended for professional archaeologists employed by government agencies or archaeological contracting firms. It will provide participants with an introduction to archaeological damage assessment. It will begin with a discussion of what archaeological damage assessment is and the legal basis for it. Next, the seminar will identify the components of archaeological damage assessment and the roles, responsibilities and timeframes involved. This will be followed by an overview of the procedures involved in:

  • field damage assessment
  • determination of values and costs as measures of harm for archaeological damage
  • damage assessment report preparation

Finally, there will be a brief discussion of the legal standards for expert witness testimony and the importance of qualifications necessary to meet these standards. At the conclusion of the seminar, the participants should understand the process of archaeological damage assessment and what their roles should be in an archaeological damage assessment for an actual archaeological violation case.

Click here to view the webpage for this online seminar.
 


SAA's Introduction to the Section 106 Process

This two-hour online seminar is intended for archaeologists who want an initial understanding of the Section 106 process. At the conclusion of the online seminar, the students will be able to outline the basic Section 106 process, identify the participants involved in the process, and summarize its procedures following 36CFR800. In addition, the student will know the basic provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act.

The seminar is limited to two hours, thus there will not be time to discuss the Section 106 process in depth. The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) provides 3-day training sessions in Section 106 compliance. ACHP also offers more advanced classes in agreement writing and other practices. Students with a familiarity of the Section 106 process should take the ACHP class or the RPA class offered SRI, Inc.

Click here to visit SAA's webpage for this seminar, including a more detailed session description.


SAA, New Measurement Technologies Used by Archaeologists with Fred Limp

The goals of this one-hour, online seminar are to introduce participants (particularly students) to the characteristics and archaeological and heritage management uses of new technologies and methods in high-precision survey methods (typically sub-millimeter to centimeter) using (a) the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and (b) "laser scanning" (and other related technologies such as close range photogrammetry and structure light measurement systems) for landscapes, sites, structures and objects.

After taking this online seminar, the participants will be able to (a) assess the capabilities of different strategies (b) the costs and benefits of the various technologies and (c) assess whether they may be of value to their projects. They will be able to characterize the basic differences in the technologies and how they may be applied in the archaeological and heritage contexts.

Click here to visit SAA's webpage for this seminar, including a more detailed session description.


SAA's Primer on the Process of Preparing and Submitting a Manuscript to American Antiquity, with Ken Sassaman, the current editor of American Antiquity!

This one-hour online seminar is designed to provide a primer on the process of preparing and aubmitting a manuscript to American Antiquity. After completing the online seminar, participants will be able to determine if their work is suited for publication in American ANtiquity; understand the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript; and take away tips for effective manuscript revision. The intended audience is first-time contributors to American Antiquity, including graduate students.

Click here to visit SAA's webpage for this seminar, including a more detailed session description.


SAA, "Public Archaeology is a Moving Target" with Barbara Little

This seminar is designed to give an overview of public archaeology as it is practiced in the United States today.

 

Attendees will come away with an understanding of three main categories of public archaeology: (1) cultural resource management (CRM) or cultural heritage management (CHM) under public law; (2) outreach and education with the intention to prevent looting and vandalism of archaeological places and to combat the illicit international trade in antiquities; and (3) archaeology that aims to help communities or individuals in some way or to solve societal problems.
 

 


SAA, "Get Hired!" with Carol Ellick

This one-hour online seminar will help both graduate and undergraduate archaeology students and recent graduates in their transition from student to a career.

After participating in this online seminar, students will be able to:

  1. Identify potential employers
  2. More accurately read and respond to job announcements
  3. Link their current knowledge, skills, and abilities gained in school and in prior jobs to those being sought after by employers.

Click here for more information about this seminar.
 


SRI Foundation Offers Two RPA-Certified Programs

The Continuing Education Program of the Register of Professional Archaeologists (RPA) and the SRI Foundation are proud to announce that there are two courses, Section 106: Principles and Practice and Completing Section 106: Resolving Adverse Effects and Writing Agreement Documents that have been certified.

The training workshops are scheduled to meet the client’s needs so the dates vary, but please contact SRI Foundation to make any inquiries and for registration information.(http://www.srifoundation.org/)

Section 106: Principles and Practice

The instructors for this workshop are Dr. Lynne Sebastian, Mr. Terry Klein, and Mr. Dave Cushman. All instructors are RPA registered professionnals and all subject matter experts in historic preservation and Section 106 compliance.

The SRI Foundation does not have a prerequisite for this workshop. The workshop is open to all eligible RPA registrants.

This two-day introductory course on compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act covers the following topics:

  • The history of historic preservation in the United States

  • The National Historic Preservation Act and other preservation laws

  • The National Register of Historic Places

  • Section 106: the process, the participants, and the potential pitfalls

  • 36 CFR Part 800, the Section 106 regulation

  • Flexibility and Section 106: The program alternatives

  • Resolving adverse effects

  • Working with consulting parties and the public

  • Standard treatments and creative mitigation measures

  • Developing and writing agreement documents

  • Coordination with the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 4(f)

Learning outcomes: at the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the standard Section 106 process and the roles of the participants in that process

  • Discuss the basic requirements for eligibility to the National Register of Historic Places

  • Describe the process for resolving adverse effects on historic properties

  • Identify the two types of Section 106 agreement documents and discuss the differences between them.

 Performance Measures: A test of the particpant's mastery of the stated objectives will administered at the end of the workshop.

Course delivery methods include lecture, class discussion, slide presentations, and small group exercises throughout both days designed to guide particpants in applying what they have learned about Section 106 compliance.

Click here to download and view the PDF flyer for Section 106: Principles and Practice.

Advanced Section 106 Course
Completing Section 106: Resolving Adverse Effects and Writing Agreement Documents

The instructors for this workshop are Dr. Lynne Sebastian, Mr. Terry Klein, and Mr. Dave Cushman. All instructors are RPA registered professionnals and all subject matter experts in historic preservation and Section 106 compliance.

The SRI Foundation does not have a prerequisite for this workshop. The workshop is open to all eligible RPA registrants. The Foundation; however, encourages participants to have substantial experience with, or training in, the Section 106 consultation process.

This two-day advanced course on compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act covers the following topics:

  • What is the purpose of the Section 106 process? What outcomes are we trying to achieve? How do we achieve an appropriate balance between the needs of transportation projects and historic preservation concerns?

  • What are the historic properties? How do we know what is important about them?

  • How are historic properties affected by transportation projects, adn what can we do about those effects?

  • Consultation and consulting parties: how to work effectively with consulting parties and the public within the Section 106 process.

  • Resolving adverse effects: How to avoid, minimize, and mitigate adverse effects on historic properties.

  • Negotiating Section 106 agreements adn preparing the agreement document

Learning outcomes: at the end of this course, particpants will be able to:

  • Describe the legislative and regulatory purpose of the Section 106 process and the relationship to FHWA policy concerning context sensitive solutions (CSS).

  • Demonstrate the process for evaluating the eligibility of properties for listing on the national Register of Histoic Places.

  • Identify the four possible findings of effect for Section 106 undertakings and define the differences among them.

  • Describe the steps in resolving adverse effects and bringing project complaince to closure

  • Define when to use a programmatic agreement or a memorandum of agreement to complete the section 106 process

  • Identify the parts of an agreement document and describe what information should be included in each part.

Performance Measures: A test of the particpant's mastery of the stated objectives will administered at the end of the workshop.

Course delivery methods include lecture, class discussion, slide presentations, and small group exercises throughout both days designed to guide particpants in applying what they have learned about Section 106 compliance.


 Advanced Metal Detecting Course is RPA-Certified

Advanced Metal Detecting for the Archaeologist (AMDA) is a course designed to teach best practices in applying metal detecting to professional research.  Our instructors recognize that there is a need for this course, as metal detecting is rarely taught in university programs.  As well, the technology of metal detecting is changing rapidly, and the professional archaeologist needs to keep abreast of the newest developments.  The class is offered for 16 RPA credits (8 hours classroom, 8 hours field) or 24 RPA credits (8 hours classroom, 16 hours field).

The AMDA class recognizes that the three main factors affecting the efficacy of a metal detector investigation are: 1) competency of the operators; 2) appropriateness of the device to the task at hand; and 3) suitability of the research design.  The classroom session stresses the application of metal detecting to various site types and levels of investigation.  The class notebooks also include a case study CD with examples of successful research efforts. 

We also recognize that professional archaeologists need an opportunity for instructor-monitored, hands-on, practical field experience with a variety of currently available devices.  AMDA has created a partnership with several manufacturers and retailers who provide trial models at various price points.  Our fieldwork sessions are designed to contribute to the research needs of our local hosts, and we work on real problems on real sites. 

The AMDA web-site can be accessed at   http://www.newsouthassoc.com/amda/index.html.  For questions on future classes, please contact Chris Espenshade at cespenshade@ccrginc.com .


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