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SAA Names Archaeology Southwest and University of Arizona's Preservation Archaeology Field School as Scholarship Recipients

The SAA has selected Archaeology Southwest and University of Arizona's Preservation Archaeology Field School at Mule Creek, New Mexico as the recipient of a $1,000 scholarship for the 2014 field season. The field school will be taught by Karen Schollmeyer, Ph.D., RPA.

That award will be split among three graduate participants in the field school.

The recipients are:

Hannah Zanotto, a recent graduate of Arizona State University. She is interested in Hohokam archaeology and connections between the prehistoric Southwest and Mesoamerica.

Maxwell Forton, a recent graduate of Michigan State University. He is interested in the archaeology of the northern Southwest, especially Ancestral Puebloan religion, rock art iconography, and how people incorporated landscapes into ideology.

Christopher Davis, a recent graduate of the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is drawn to ceramics, ceramic iconography, lithics, and ethnohistory in the Southwest, as well as studying how ancient people used their environments.

We are looking forward to all three recipients becoming RPAs once they have completed their graduate studies.


THE AAA, THE REGISTER OF PROFESSIONAL ARCHAEOLOGISTS, ANNOUNCE TWO $500 SCHOLARSHIPS

At the recommendation of the Archaeology Division of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), the Register of Professional Archaeologists is pleased to announce the award of two $500 field school scholarships to students attending the California State University – Chico – field school.

Betty’s Hope, a former sugar plantation on the Caribbean island of Antigua, operated from 1651 to 1944, and provides an ideal laboratory to learn about the methodologies of historical archaeology, plantation studies, and the African Diaspora. For the summer field school component of 2013, there will be continued excavation, remote sensing, surveying and mapping of this large site to further understand the plantation as a system, and its impact on the everyday lives of the people who lived and worked there. This summer’s project will include special emphasis on diet and health through the study of the site’s faunal remains, and applications of watershed analysis and GIS to landscape theory and the power dynamics of British colonialism. The dynamics of coupled natural and human systems theory will be field tested in assessing the profound changes caused by cane agriculture on island ecosystems. This will be the first field season where hand-held XRF will be used to instruct students in the scientific applications of artifact analysis. The island archaeologist is Dr. Reginald Murphy, and principle investigator and field director is Dr. Georgia Fox (CSU Chico).

Scholarship Recipients

Alexis Ohman, a native Californian, is currently an MA Candidate in Archaeology at Simon Fraser University, with a BA in Anthropology from the University of Victoria. She acquired an acute interest in foodways and plantation archaeology as an undergraduate, which has developed into a fascination with Caribbean zooarchaeology and the contexts that the Lesser Antillean islands have to offer. Alexis intends to start a Ph.D. program next year in order to continue this type of research, and to explore new opportunities in Caribbean zooarchaeology as they unfold.

Geneviève Godbout is a Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology at the University of Chicago. Her current research concerns taste and hospitality on plantations of Antigua, Caribbean, ca.1750-1900. She uses archaeological, archaeobotanical remains, and archival data to study the contribution of the convivial consumption of food and drink to the social life of the plantation. Through her dissertation work, she hopes to clarify the role of imported metropolitan material and practices in Antiguan social habits, as well as the relative intersection of the managers’ and laborer’s social spheres, both during slavery and after Emancipation (1834). Geneviève hopes to pursue archaeological field research throughout her career, whether as an academic or heritage manager.


 

THE SOCIETY FOR AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY (SAA), THE REGISTER OF PROFESSIONAL ARCHAEOLOGISTS ANNOUNCE TWO $500 SCHOLARSHIPS  

At the recommendation of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA), the Register of Professional Archaeologists is pleased to announce the award of two $500 scholarships. The first award is to the Archaeology Southwest/University of Arizona’s Preservation Archaeology Field School, Co-Principal Investigators, Deborah L. Huntley and Jeffery J. Clark. The field school is conducting research at the Fornholt site (LA 164471), a multicomponent settlement in Mule Creek, New Mexico. Student recipients of this award include David Loome (Northern Arizona University) and Jay Stephens (University of Arizona). The second SAA award is to California State University, Northridge, Field School Co-Principal Investigators Wendy G. Teeter, Karimah Kennedy-Richardson, and Desiree Martinez, for the Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Project, California. The student recipient of this award is Jeni Knack, an undergraduate at UCLA in Anthropology. Both RPA-certified field schools provide opportunities for Native people or the native community to be integrated into the field school experience.


 

THE REGISTER OF PROFESSIONAL ARCHAEOLOGISTS AWARDS $1,000 TO CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTHRIDGE'S RPA-CERTIFIED FIELD SCHOOL

 

The Register of Professional Archaeologists is pleased to announce the award of a $1,000 scholarship to California State University, Northridge's RPA-certified field school. This award was made to California State University, Northridge's Field School Director, Wendy Teeter, who divided the money between two deserving students. The field school is part of the Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Project (PCIAP) off of the coast of southern California, with the objective of addressing inter- and intra-village relationships and cultural life of the Catalina Island Tongva.

The first $500 recipient was Rachel Nuzzo, she is an Anthropology undergrad from UCLA. Rachel commented on why the field school matters to her. She said, “To be honest, the Course Objectives section of the syllabus for the field school almost perfectly sums up what I want to accomplish with this field school. I hope to learn all I can about the Tongva and other cultures of study, learn how real excavations work, how things work in the lab, and get field experience in an area I believe I would like to concentrate on before I decide where to apply to graduate school. My area of interest is West Coast US Native American/West Coast British Columbian First Nations Archaeology. This field school fits perfectly within my area of interest, my subfield of interest, and I hope it will help give me the tools to proceed down my academic path with confidence.”

The second $500 recipient was Sarah Sederholm, she completed her BA in 2008 in Anthropology from Cal State Long Beach and is currently completing a GIS certificate from Southwestern College. With respect to her field school goals, Sarah said, “I hope to learn how to survey, excavate, and catalogue archaeological finds as well as learn to properly use a Trimble, compass and other GPS tools. I would also like the experience of meeting new people and working with others that are also equally as passionate about archaeology as I am.”

Congratulations to all!


TJ FERGUSON, JO REESE AND KIM REDMAN RECEIVE AWARDS FROM THE REGISTER OF PROFESSIONAL ARCHAEOLOGISTS

 

 


TJ Ferguson receiving the award from President Lynne Sebastian

Charles R. McGimsey—Hester A. Davis Distinguished Service Award

In the history of cultural resource management, Dr. T.J. Ferguson stands out as one of the pioneers who has worked forcefully and persistently to break down barriers between Native Americans and archaeologists and to build collaborative efforts which ensure that tribal values and archaeological perspectives are taken into consideration in resource management decisions.

Dr. Ferguson has taken the professional road less traveled. His journey began in the 1970s, when he enrolled in the University of Arizona’s MA program which contained one of the earliest CRM tracks in the United States. As a student of R. Gwinn Vivian, TJ was offered the opportunity to work at the Pueblo of Zuni, and so began a lifelong attachment to the Pueblo people.

Between 1976 and 1981 he served in a variety of capacities for the Pueblo, eventually becoming the Director of the Zuni Archaeological Program. He returned as Acting Director of the Zuni Archaeology Program and the Zuni Cultural Resources Enterprise in 1984-1985. At Zuni, he helped to train tribal members in cultural resource management, providing them with job skills and career opportunities, while implementing CRM policies that respected Zuni values and beliefs. Among other accomplishments, TJ assisted in the campaign to repatriate the War Gods, communally owned sacred objects needed to perpetuate Zuni religion, and in so doing helped to shape the concept of cultural patrimony used years later in the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. He also served as an expert witness for the Pueblo of Zuni n their successful land claims case.

Since the mid-1980s TJ has worked as a consulting anthropologist for tribes in the American Southwest. Much of his work has been with the Hopi Tribe. Together with Leigh Kuwanwisiwma, Director of the Hopi Tribe’s Cultural Preservation Office, TJ has written numerous reports and papers that have presented a collaborative methodology to the identification and evaluation of traditional cultural properties.

Having received his PhD from the University of New Mexico in 1993, TJ was able to enter a new phase of his career beginning in 2007, when he was named a Professor of Practice at the University of Arizona’s School of Anthropology. In this role, TJ helped to establish the university’s applied archaeology MA program. In 2012, he was appointed a Professor in the School of Anthropology, where he continues to coordinate the applied anthropology program, serves as editor of the University of Arizona’s anthropological papers, and at the same time continues to consult on projects to ensure that tribal values are considered as part of cultural resource management and the compliance process.

Bob McGimsey and Hester Davis blazed a trail built on ethical practices and standards of performance that archaeologists continue to follow. TJ has not simply followed this path, he has added on to it in ways that have advanced archaeological practice by ensuring that the voices and values of descendant communities are heard. We are all better for his efforts.

 

 

The Register of Professional Archaeologists is proud to present the Charles R. McGimsey—Hester A. Davis Distinguished Award for 2013 to T.J. Ferguson.


 

 


Jo Reese receiving the award from President Lynne Sebastian

 

 

RPA 2013 SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

The Register’s Special Achievement Award is given “in recognition of a profound and meaningful contribution to the promotion of professionalism in archaeology”. This year’s awardee has been a quiet but extremely effective instrument of change in professional archaeology, and more broadly within cultural resource management.

Jo Reese is the co-owner, co-founder and Vice President of Archaeological Investigations Northwest, Inc., established in 1989. AINW is based in Portland, Oregon, and has more than 30 full-time staff working throughout the Pacific Northwest. She has a Masters Degree in anthropology from Washington State University, and has been working in archaeology for 37 years (i.e. since the age of three).

Jo was an early applicant to the Register and has been an RPA since 2000. Since then she has served two distinguished terms on the RPA Board, representing the Society for American Archaeology, her second term having ended (to our great regret) just yesterday. Anyone who has encountered Jo on the RPA Board or committees will tell you that her good-nature, calm and collegial wisdom, and super glue-like tenacity are a huge asset to any organization, and the Register has been very fortunate to have her actively involved for so long.

In addition to these valuable general contributions to the Register, Jo has one very specific achievement that we are honoring here tonight. This is the development and successful launch of the Register’s Continuing Professional Education Certification Program.

After much discussion within the archaeological community, the Register’s Continuing Professional Education certification efforts began in earnest in 2007 under Jo’s leadership. By 2009 draft objectives and procedures had been outlined. Those were refined and finalized in 2011, and the procedures for submitting and reviewing certification requests were completed and announced to the world. Within a very short time, the first certified CPE offerings bearing the imprimatur of the Register were being offered, thanks to Jo’s leadership and the afore mentioned super glue-like tenacity.

For her effective advocacy of professionalism in archaeological education during her many years of active commitment to the Register, the Register of Professional Archaeologists is proud to present the 2013 Special Achievement Award to Jo Reese.


 


 
Kim Redman receiving a Presidential Recognition Award for her contributions to the successful completion of the Register's new exhibit from President Lynn Sebastian


 

New Members Join RPA Board

 


Left to right—Pat Garrow, President-elect; Andrew Moore, AIA representative; Charles Cobb, AAA-AD representative; Danny Walker, Registrat; Lynne Sebastian, President; Amanda Evans, SHA representative; Doug Mitchell, Grievance Coordinator-elect; Jim Bruseth, Grievance Coordinator; Susan Chandler, SAA representative; not shown Chuck Niquette, Secretary-Treasurer


The RPA Board is happy to welcome new members Chuck Niquette, Doug Mitchell, and Susan Chandler. The Board was also VERY happy to welcome the Register's new banner stand exhibit, shown in the background of the photo!

 


 

 UPDATE ON ADVANCED METAL DETECTING FOR THE ARCHAEOLOGIST

Advanced Metal Detecting for the Archaeologist (AMDA) completed its second class, on April 19-21, at Troup Factory, Georgia. Twenty-two students successfully completed the course. As with the first class in Charles Towne Landing, the course reviews for Troup Factory were strongly positive.

Dan Elliott of the LAMAR Institute joined our teaching staff prior to the Troup Factory training, and Jo Balicki of John Milner Associates will be an instructor starting at our autumn class.

AMDA will present its third class offering, in Winchester, Virginia in November 2013. AMDA is certified under the Register of Professional Archaeologists’ continuing professional education program. The goal of the class is to provide professional archaeologists with an understanding of current best practices in metal detecting, and to provide the opportunity to gain hands-on experience with a variety of devices from a variety of manufacturers.

The course is offered with 16-credit and 24-credit options. Under the former, there are 8 hours of classroom work and 8 hours of field instruction/experience. Under the latter, the field portion is expanded to 16 hours and the classroom remains 8 hours. Fees will be $250 for 16 credits and $350 for 24 credits. There are spaces for 29 students, interest is strong, so folks are encouraged to sign up right away.

The classroom portion (November 15) will be held at Shenandoah University in Winchester, VA. The field portion (November 16, plus November 17 for the 24-credit option) will be held at Clermont Farm, a state historic site that includes standing buildings from as early as 1770 (801 East Main Street, Berryville, VA). The VA DHR management plan for Clermont Farm calls for metal detector survey in several areas of the property (see
www.clermontfarm.org ).

For more information, please contact Chris Espenshade at
cespenshade@ccrginc.com or Patrick Severts at (770) 594-4734 or Pseverts@newsouthassoc.com .

For an application form, please see
http://www.newsouthassoc.com/amda/index.html


ADVANCED METAL DETECTING FOR THE ARCHAEOLOGIST,
WINCHESTER, VIRGINIA, NOVEMBER 15-17, 2013

 

Advanced Metal Detecting for the Archaeologist (AMDA) will present its third class offering, in Winchester, Virginia in November 2013. AMDA is certified under the Register of Professional Archaeologists’ continuing professional education program. The goal of the class is to provide professional archaeologists with an understanding of current best practices in metal detecting, and to provide the opportunity to gain hands-on experience with a variety of devices from a variety of manufacturers.

The course is offered with 16-credit and 24-credit options. Under the former, there are 8 hours of classroom work and 8 hours of field instruction/experience. Under the latter, the field portion is expanded to 16 hours and the classroom remains 8 hours. Fees have not yet been finalized, but earlier classes were $250 for 16 credits and $350 for 24 credits.

The classroom portion (November 15) will be held at Shenandoah University. The field portion (November 16, plus November 17 for the 24-credit option) will be held at Clermont Farm, a state historic site. The VA DHR management plan for Clermont Farm calls for metal detector survey in several areas of the property.

For more information please contact Chris Espenshade at
cespenshade@crgginc.com or Patrick Severts at (770) 594-4734 or Pseverts@newsouthassoc.com . If you send an e-mail expressing your interest, we will update you as more information becomes finalized.

For additional information, please see

http://www.newsouthassoc.com/amda/index.html

 


Announcing the RPA Field School Scholarship!

The Register of Professional Archaeologists announces its Field School Scholarships, which are awarded annually to students from RPA-certified field schools. One scholarship in the amount of $1000 will be awarded by each of three of RPA’s sponsoring institutions (AAA, SAA, SHA) to the director of an RPA-certified field school. The director will then be free to award the scholarship to a deserving student or students. New field school certification applications must be submitted by February 28, 2013, to be considered in the 2013 scholarship pool.

All currently certified field schools are automatically eligible for the scholarships. SAA and AAA require that the field school director be a member of their respective organizations in order to be eligible to receive a scholarship from that organization. SHA does not have such a requirement for its scholarship. Scholarships will be announced at the 2013 RPA Awards Reception on April 4, 2013, at the SAA meeting in Honolulu.

What is RPA Field School Certification?
RPA Certification means that your field school has met a set of professional standards covering five areas:

  • Purpose. The field school must have both an explicit research design and an explicit curriculum design that integrates research with student education.
  • Personnel. The Director or Principal Investigator of the field school must be a Registered Professional Archaeologist.
  • Operational Procedure. The field school must include formal instruction on field techniques including excavation, survey, and laboratory work.
  • Field Procedure. The field school must include proper data recovery and recording techniques.
  • Sponsor. The sponsoring institution must provide appropriate resources for laboratory work, curation, and publication/distribution of the research results.

Why Certify Your Field School?
Field schools are the training ground for the next generation of archaeologists and an important public face of archaeology. They should display our discipline’s highest standards of research and site stewardship. Both students and prospective employers can be confident that a certified field school meets established professional standards.

Benefits of certification include:

  • national recognition of your field school’s high standards of student training and site recording
  • advertisement of your field school on RPA and RPA-affiliated web sites
  • eligibility for RPA student field school scholarships

Is your field school already certified? Congratulations! You are automatically eligible for one of these scholarships!


The Register’s Awards Committee is seeking recommendations from RPA’s for our 2012 awards, and also for the bestowal of Emeritus registration. These awards will be made at the Society for American Archaeology meeting in Hawaii, April 3-7 2013.

The final decision on awards and Emeritus status is made by the RPA Board on the recommendation of the Awards Committee.

In order for the Committee to deliberate, make recommendations to the Board, and arrange for the preparation of certificates and plaques, we will be unable to consider recommendations made after February 15th.

The Register currently has four awards, one of which, the Presidential Recognition Award, is granted at-will by the incumbent president for various reasons relating to service to RPA or the profession and discipline of Archaeology.

The committee welcome nominations for the other three awards, which are listed below together with the names of previous recipients:

Special Achievement Award: Presented by the Register of Professional Archaeologists in recognition of a profound and meaningful contribution to the promotion of professionalism in archaeology. This award may be given to one or more individuals, one or more organizations, or a combination of individuals or organizations (Initial award 2005)

Date Recipients

2005

State Archaeologist, Kevin T. Jones Utah Professional Archaeological Council

2006

Charles R. “Chip” McGimsey

2007

Ed Jelks

2008

William B. Lees

2009

Laurie W. Rush

2010

Willem Willems

2011

Paul R. Green


Charles R. McGimsey III—Hester A. Davis Distinguished Service Award (McGimsey-Davis Distinguished Service Award): Presented in recognition of the distinguished service of a Registered Professional Archaeologist to achieving the mission of the Register of Professional Archaeologists as evidenced by a single action or through a lifetime of elevated service (Initial award 2005).

Date Recipients

2005

Charles R. McGimsey III
Hester A. Davis

2006

William Lipe Ph.D.

2007

Fred Wendorf, Jr.

2008

Don D. Fowler

2009

Lynne Sebastian

2010

Donald Weir

2011

Donald L. Hardesty

John F. Seiberling Award: Established by SOPA in 1986 in the name of Ohio Congressman Seiberling, for his many legislative efforts in support of historic preservation. Seiberling himself received the first award. The award was intended to recognize significant and sustained efforts in the conservation of archeological resources by an individual or group.  

Date Recipients

1986

Hon. John F. Seiberling

1987

Larry D. Banks

1988

no award given

1989

no award given

1990

Fred Wendorf

1991

Robert L. Stevenson

1992

The Archaeological Conservancy

1992

Hon. Charles Bennett

1994

Hester A. Davis

1995

Hon. Wyche Fowler

1996

Loretta Newman

1997

The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

2010

Nellie Longsworth

Emeritus Status
SOPA began granting Emeritus Status and Life Membership in 1990 and thereafter bestowed it occasionally by board vote upon recommendation of the Awards Committee.
RPA Emeritus status was first bestowed by RPA in 2010. Emeritus status is generally bestowed on individual. 

Date Recipients

1990

James B. Griffin *

1990

Jesse Jennings *

1992

Irving B. Rouse *

1992

Edward B. Jelks

1996

John L. Cotter *

1996

Charles R. McGimsey III

2010

Fred Wendorf & Chuck Cleland

Please send recommendations to:
Ian Burrow
Chair, RPA Awards Committee
Hunter Research, Inc.
120 West State Street
Trenton, NJ 08608
iburrow@hunterresearch.com

Please provide details of the person(s) or organization you are recommending, and for which award you feel they should be considered.


Are you interested in serving the Register of Professional Archaeologists on a committee or in an elected position? There are many opportunities for service:

Committees:
Continuing Professional Education Certification Committee
Field School Certification Committee
Nominating Committee
Recruitment Committee

Elected Offices:
Standards Board
Nominating Committee Chair or member
Registrar
Grievance Coordinator -elect
Secretary/Treasurer
President-elect

If you are interested in any of these opportunities or want to know more about them, please contact Lynne Sebastian at lsebastian@srifoundation.org or any other member of the RPA Board.


 

ADVANCED METAL DETECTING FOR THE ARCHAEOLOGIST,
SECOND CLASS OFFERING

Building on the success of their first course offering in Charleston, S.C. in August 2012, Advanced Metal Detecting for the Archaeologist (AMDA) and the continuing professional education program of the Register of Professional Archaeologists (RPA) are proud to announce that the second AMDA course offering will be April, 19-21, 2013 in Pine Mountain, Georgia. The local sponsors this year are the Corless family, the caretakers of the site since 1932. Students can earn either 16 (two-day) or 24 (three-day) RPA continuing education credits.

The tuition is $250.00 (16 credits) or $350.00 (24 credits). Seven instructors and additional industry representatives will be present, and we have room for 30 students. The April course will take place at the Troup Factory complex (1829-1902), which includes the archaeological remains of a large textile mill, a mill village, a dam and raceway, cemeteries, a farmstead, tenant houses, and even a whiskey still. The training will consist of one full day of lectures on best practices for metal detecting for the professional archaeologist, and one or two full days of practical field instruction. As a bonus, on Friday evening, Forest Clark Johnson III will speak on the history of the Troup Factory and village, and on Saturday, Dr. Douglas Scott (father of modern military archaeology) will talk about his approaches to Conflict Archaeology. The site is conveniently located less than an hour south of the Atlanta airport off of State Highway 27. The lecture will be held at the Pine Mountain Club Chalets; they also offer affordable cabin rentals for individuals or groups (http://pinemountainclubchalets.com). Course tuition includes catered lunches each day, snacks, and drinks. For more information please contact Chris Espenshade at cespenshade@crgginc.com or Patrick Severts at (770) 594-4734 or Pseverts@newsouthassoc.com.

Click to download the Conference Registration Form.

Mail completed form and check to: New South Associates, 6150 East Ponce de Leon Avenue, Stone Mountain, Georgia 30083.

Completed registration forms and checks must be received by March 15, 2013.


Calling All RPA Volunteers

RPA is looking for volunteers willing to take a shift greeting current and future registrants at the RPA table in the exhibit hall for the SHA meeting in Leicester, January 9-12, and the AIA meeting in Seattle, January 3-6. It’s fun, easy, and a great opportunity to see all your friends (everyone passes through the exhibit hall sooner or later!) and make new friends while helping out the Register. If you are interested, please contact Andrew Moore, AIA representative to the RPA Board (andrew.moore@rit.edu) or Amanda Evans, SHA representative on the RPA Board (evansa@teslaoffshore.com)


RPA 2012-2013 Election Results

The RPA Board of Directors is pleased to announce the results of the 2012-2013 election. The new officers will be Chuck Niquette, Secretary/Treasurer, and Doug Mitchell, Grievance Coordinator-elect. The new Standards Board member will be Vergil Noble and the new Standards Board Alternate will be April Beisaw. Mike Polk was elected Chair of the Nominating Committee and David Hart was elected Nominating Committee Member. The three bylaws amendments making the Registrar, Grievance Coordinator, and Grievance Coordinator-elect voting rather than ex officio members of the Board all passed.

We wish to thank all those who agreed to stand for election and express our appreciation for their willingness to serve the Register.


RPA Field School Scholarships

Each year the Register provides scholarship opportunities for students attending RPA certified archaeological field school. Each of our sponsor organizations is given the opportunity to award one of these scholarships or to split the scholarship money between two students.

2012 AAA-Selected Field School Scholarship Recipients

Through the 2007-2011 field seasons, the Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Project (PCIAP) off of the coast of southern California has expanded the knowledge of understanding inter- and intra-village relationships and cultural life of the Catalina Island Tongva. To further research about these relationships, the


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